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Table 2 Frequency and percentage of the students’ responses to the 19 sources of stress categorized as either academic, psychosocial, or inadequacy in teaching

From: Stress and its correlates among medical students in six medical colleges: an attempt to understand the current situation

Stress source High (%) Some (%) Not at all (%)
Academic factors
 Exam frequency 275 (44.57%) 250 (40.51%) 92 (14.91%)
 Fear of failure 321 (52.02%) 207 (33.54%) 89 (14.42%)
 High self-expectation 219 (35.49%) 284 (46.02%) 114(18.47%)
 Competition with peers 145 (23.50%) 258 (41.81%) 214 (34.68%)
 Tight schedule 216 (35.00%) 296 (47.97%) 105 (17.01%)
 Heavy workload 361 (58.50%) 196 (31.76%) 60 (9.72%)
 Time pressure 371 (60.12%) 183 (29.65%) 63 (10.21%)
 Attendance 231 (37.43%) 196 (31.76%) 190 (30.79%)
Psychosocial factors
 Poor motivation 192 (31.11%) 267 (43.27%) 158 (25.60%)
 Financial problems 53 (8.58%) 184 (29.82%) 380 (61.58%)
 Family problems 69 (11.18%) 154 (24.59%) 394 (63.85%)
 Lack of family support 72 (11.66%) 139 (22.52%) 406 (65.80%)
 High parental expectation 205 (33.22%) 231 (37.43%) 181 (29.33%)
 Relationship with opposite sex 82 (13.29%) 164 (26.58%) 371 (60.12%)
 Study away from home 153 (24.79%) 158 (25.60%) 306 (49.59%)
 Loneliness 164 (26.58%) 185 (29.98%) 268 (43.43%)
Teaching-related factors
 Poor teaching skills 183 (29.65%) 306 (49.59%) 128 (20.74%)
 Poor teacher support 204 (33.06%) 301 (48.78%) 112 (18.15%)
 Difficulty understanding lectures 183 (29.65%) 298 (48.29%) 136 (22.04%)
  1. Table 2 show academic, psychosocial, and teaching-related factors have a lot, some, or no effect on medical students. Only effects of high level of stress-related symptoms were included in chronological order. For instance, factors associated with academic section that scored high were time pressure (60.3%), heavy workload (58.7%), and fear of failure 52.2%). Importantly, psychosocial and teaching-related factors were all scored less than 34%