Skip to main content

Table 2 Comparison between nurses diagnosed with/without burnout syndrome and/or post-traumatic stress disorder

From: Prevalence and predictors of burnout syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety in nursing staff in various departments

  Nurses with burnout syndrome and no post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 128) Nurses with burnout syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 31) Nurses without burnout syndrome not post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 17) Nurses with post-traumatic stress disorder and no burnout syndrome (N = 5) P value
Gender (female) N (%) 119 (92.9%) 30 (96.7%) 15 (88.2%) 5(100%) 0.63(1)
Age in years (X ± SD) 38 ± 9.91 36.61 ± 10.21 45.52 ± 10.51 37.4 ± 12.46 0.02(2)
Experience in years (X ± SD) 18.68 ± 9.8 17.64 ± 10.7 26.7 ± 9.6 18 ± 12.84 0.01(3)
Patient/nurses (X ± SD) 12.42 ± 11.03 11.22 ± 10.04 13.58 ± 6.78 18.2 ± 2.94 0.54(3)
Nurses’ reliability in other nurses (X ± SD) 3.7 ± 0.59 3.64 ± 0.8 3.64 ± 0.49 3.8 ± 0.44 0.62(3)
Nurses’ reliability in physicians (X ± SD) 3.77 ± 0.45 3.61 ± 0.61 3.47 ± 0.62 3.6 ± 0.54 0.06(3)
Nurses’ cooperation in patients’ care N (%) 122 (95.3%) 26 (83.9%) 16 (94.1%) 5 (100%) 0.12(1)
The importance of the care of the nurse in patients’ prognosis N (%) 127 (99%) 28 (90.3%) 14 (82.4%) 5 (100%) 0.01(1)
  1. Fisher’s exact test (1), ANOVA test (2), Kruskal-Wallis test (3)